Report analyses the 'last mile problem'

20th July 2017
Posted By : Alice Matthews
Report analyses the 'last mile problem'

The latest IDTechEx Research report, Last Mile Electric Vehicles 2018-2028, concerns goods and people reaching final destination such as down the pathway past the guard dog or riding from the train station. Currently costing up to 55% of shipment costs, today's expensive methods tend to be dangerous, polluting or slow. Solving this 'last mile problem' is key to Amazon's objective of grabbing Wal-Mart's business and other battles of the titans.

This 110 page report analyses how the trillion dollar EV business will assist. See appraisal and opportunities in easily understood infograms and statistics such as the vulnerable $726bn+ trucking revenues, more than Google, Amazon and Walmart combined. Last Mile Electric Vehicles 2018-2028 gives ten year number, unit value and market value forecasts for the 16 relevant EV categories and background statistics.

It appraises all options for last mile delivery of people and things, from drones to Domino Pizza sidewalk robots and taxi/bus robots planned by Tesla and most of the trillion dollar automotive industry. Learn how electric vehicles best leverage autonomy and the courier business will be transformed.

For those with limited time, the Executive Summary and Conclusions is sufficiently complete and image-packed. Shortcomings of many types of EV in these tasks are surfaced not just the obvious limitations of the old technologies.

The Introduction exposes definitions, challenges and options and package and person delivery modes emerging, the emphasis being on comparing alternatives, identifying best investments and forecasting. Understand China with 98% of the world's electric bikes and pure electric buses including LM driverless bus/taxis.

Chapter three of the report brings the subject alive by looking at case studies of last mile delivery of goods. Here we are tackling such problems as emergency supplies not getting through and fresh food delivery being considered inadequate by customers and unprofitable for suppliers. How do we deal with traffic congestion and pollution worsening in cities, aggravated by burgeoning delivery vehicles for internet shopping? How is Amazon stealing market share using last mile and taking on Wal-Mart? Learn about the Amazon drone hive and how courier company Deutsche Post DHL is even making last mile EVs for the open market, not just using them alongside its innovative drone stations.

What is the first commercial driverless delivery vehicle for things and people? How is start up PonyZero in Italy growing so fast internationally using EVs with precise delivery time? How does Tesco, the largest UK supermarket chain newly offer one hour delivery by EV?

Chapter four critically reveals many new ways of delivering people using EVs including EV mobility for the disabled and the huge potential in India and the Philippines. Learn the good and bad about those new autonomous taxi-buses, when they get deployed in large numbers, where and for what. We cover radical concept transportation, a search and rescue amphibious electric boat that can climb mountains at 45 degrees and electric personal and taxi aircraft.

Chapter five considers EVs for delivering goods, including sidewalk robots and examples of rollouts. Drones are appraised in detail too including tackling drones suffering and causing damage. Learn how ones dropping cargo at destination and disposable single trip delivery drones may help and understand evolving legal constraints. How is that shaping up in Rwanda?

Chapter six of Last Mile Electric Vehicles 2018-2028 appraises key enabling technologies including energy independent vehicles such as new cargo trikes, microbuses and unmanned inflated wings carrying heavy cargo and lowering it precisely to final destination. For even more on specifics of technology, new IDTechEx reports are available on batteries, motors, autonomy, power electronics, range extenders, energy harvesting for electric vehicles and so on: this report is part of a complete service including 30 minutes free consultancy on your outstanding questions. According to the company it is the only comprehensive appraisal and prediction based on multi-lingual PhD level analysts continuously travelling worldwide, web searches, IDTechEx databases, interviews, benchmarking and more.


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