Tailor-made 3D-MID solutions for automotive applications

11th April 2019
Posted By : Alex Lynn
Tailor-made 3D-MID solutions for automotive applications

A division of the HARTING Technology Group based in Biel, Switzerland, HARTING AG Biel, used the recent Geneva Motor Show to feature its expertise in 3D-MID (three-dimensional moulded interconnect device) technology solutions for the automotive industry. Applications featured included a position sensor for adaptive cruise control and a robot hand which is used to simulate human gripping processes.

3D-MID technology enables the production of integrated electronic devices with a small footprint which are suited to in-car applications such as driver assistance systems, safety features or infotainment equipment.

Susanne Giehl, Managing Director of HARTING AG Biel, said: “As more and more electronics systems find their way into cars, so HARTING’s 3D-MID technology is becoming a key driver in helping customers integrate complex electronics with minimal space requirements into today’s automotive environment. 

“With many years of experience under its belt, HARTING AG Biel understands the demands of the automotive industry, and we have successfully completed numerous projects in close co-operation with customers, many of which have gone on to series production by HARTING.” 

One of these projects is a new position sensor for adaptive cruise control systems, which automatically regulate the safe distance to the vehicle in front via a sensor in the front area of the vehicle. HARTING's MID solution successfully reduced the size of the ACC while achieving greater precision.

HARTING AG is also co-operating with the Shadow Robot Company on how to achieve greater safety by integrating 3D-MID components inside the vehicle to aid in the recognition of driver vital signs.

In addition, the company has developed a robot hand in conjunction with an e-mobility solution. This hand resembles a human hand in size and function. It has 24 joints, 20 of which can be controlled independently. The hand is mainly used to research algorithms to simulate human gripping processes. 

“The robot hand makes clear the variety of opportunities offered by 3D-MID technology,” added Giehl.


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